Home / Science / How Scientists Resolved the Mystery of the Devil’s Corkscrews | At the Smithsonian
How Scientists Resolved the Mystery of the Devil’s Corkscrews |
At the Smithsonian

How Scientists Resolved the Mystery of the Devil’s Corkscrews | At the Smithsonian

How Scientists Resolved the Mystery of the Devil’s Corkscrews |
At the Smithsonian

One of the maximum bizarre fossils ever to be discovered are peculiar tall constructions recovered throughout Nebraska, basically in the state’s northwestern badlands and in neighboring portions of Wyoming. Known in the neighborhood as Devil’s Corkscrews, each and every construction is the infilling of a left- or right-handed spiral or helix that may prolong as much as seven ft into the floor. At the deep finish of the spiral, a tunnel extends sideways and up at an perspective. These constructions become uncovered through weathering of the cushy rock enclosing them on the aspects of bluffs or ravines. They principally happen in the fine-grained sandstones of the Harrison Formation, which dates from the Miocene epoch and are about 20 to 23 million years previous.

It was once paleontologist Erwin H. Barbour who first came upon them. “Their forms are magnificent; their symmetry perfect; their organization beyond my comprehension,” he wrote.

Barbour assembled a wonderful fossil assortment at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln in the past due 19th century. Ably assisted through his spouse Margaret and with monetary improve from one of the college’s trustees, he constructed a foundational assortment of fossil mammals from Nebraska, courting most commonly from the Neogene, about 23 to two.58 million years in the past. Today, the University of Nebraska State Museum of Natural History is legendary for its fossil treasures, which file the range of mammals huge and small dwelling when the grasslands of the mid-continent advanced. Its maximum impressive exhibition is a parade of the many extinct species of elephants that after roamed throughout what’s nowadays the midwestern United States.




Writing of the fossils he'd discovered, Erwin H. Barbour described their forms as

Writing of the fossils he’d came upon, Erwin H. Barbour described their bureaucracy as “magnificent” and their symmetry “perfect.”

( Wikimedia Commons)

While exploring the western phase of Nebraska, Barbour amassed dozens of examples of the massive spiral constructions, reporting on them in 1892 and naming them Daimonelix (Greek for “devil’s screw,” steadily spelled Daemonelix). Their starting place was once a thriller and there was once not anything else like them in the fossil report. After first taking into consideration them as imaginable stays of massive freshwater sponges, Barbour surmised that the fossils of Daimonelix had been the stays of vegetation, in all probability root methods, as a result of he had came upon plant tissues inside of the helices.

A 12 months later, the mythical American vertebrate paleontologist Edward Drinker Cope rejected Barbour’s interpretation of the fossils, noting that “the most probable explanation of these objects seems to be that they are the casts of the burrows of some large rodent.”

In the similar 12 months, the Austrian paleontologist Theodor Fuchs, an expert on hint fossils, independently arrived at the similar conclusion. He famous “thus we’re justified in viewing those peculiar fossils as in point of fact not anything greater than the underground houses of Miocene rodents, almost definitely associated with Geomys [pocket gophers].”




Known as Devil’s Corkscrews, each structure is the infilling of a left- or right-handed spiral or helix that can extend up to seven feet into the ground. At the deep end of the spiral, a tunnel extends sideways and up at an angle.

Known as Devil’s Corkscrews, each and every construction is the infilling of a left- or right-handed spiral or helix that may prolong as much as seven ft into the floor. At the deep finish of the spiral, a tunnel extends sideways and up at an perspective.

( Wikimedia Commons)

But Professor Barbour would have none of this and printed a critique of Fuchs’s research in 1894. Assuming that the rocks of the Harrison Formation had been lake deposits, Barbour commented that “Dr. Fuchs’ gopher is left to burrow and build its nest of dry hay in one or two hundred fathoms of Miocene water.” (Fuchs had doubted that the surrounding rocks had been lake deposits and interpreted the plant stays discovered through Barbour as hay saved through the burrow-maker.)

Another American paleontologist, Olaf Peterson, amassed specimens of the Devil’s Corkscrews for the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh. He seen that they steadily contained skeletons of an historical beaver, Palaeocastor, which was once rather better than nowadays’s black-tailed prairie canine. And so, Peterson supported Cope’s reinterpretation.

But Barbour vehemently defended his identity of the Devil’s Corkscrews as a type of plant fossil. He replied to supporters of the rodent-burrow speculation, “If this is in truth the work of a gopher then it must stand as a lasting monument to the genius of that creature which laid the lines of his complex abode with such invariable precision and constancy.”

Exhibit in Fossil Hall of burrow
The Daimonelix burrow with a skeleton of its maker, the extinct beaver Palaeocaster is on view in the fossil corridor at the National Museum of Natural History.

(Lucia RM Martino, NMNH)

Fuchs and others interpreted peculiar grooves on the infillings of the burrows as claw marks left through the digging animal. In time maximum researchers, together with Barbour’s former scholar and successor at the State Museum, C. Bertrand Schultz, regarded as the constructions fossil rodent burrows.

For a few years, no additional analysis was once undertaken on the id of Daimonelix and the factor remained in a stalemate.

Enter Larry Martin, knowledgeable on fossil mammals at the University of Kansas. In the early 1970s, Martin and his scholar Deb Bennett studied many of the Devil’s Corkscrews in the box and in the lab. Their analysis on Daimonelix, printed in 1977, painted a fully new image of those peculiar spiral constructions and their starting place.

By the time the Kansas researchers began their paintings, geologists had lengthy rejected the lake deposit concept of the Harrison Formation and established that its fine-grained sediments had been as a substitute accrued through wind beneath seasonally dry stipulations slightly very similar to the prevailing stipulations in western Nebraska nowadays. These deposits now not handiest preserved the Devil’s Corkscrews, but in addition plentiful fossil plant roots and burrows made through bugs and small mammals.

Martin and Bennett discovered that the incisor enamel of the extinct beaver Palaeocastor had been an excellent fit for the grooves on the infillings of the Devil’s Corkscrews. These enamel marks affirmed that they had been, actually, burrows, spiraling tunnels that the beaver Palaeocastor constructed principally through excavating the soil with left- and right-handed strokes of its huge, flat incisors. The animal additionally left claw marks, however they tended to be confined to the aspects and backside of the burrows. The preliminary burrow prolonged down as a tightly coiled spiral. At the backside, the beaver began digging upwards at an perspective of as much as 30 levels to create a chamber for itself. This portion of the burrow from time to time prolonged as much as 15 ft.

The Daimonelix-building Palaeocastor sported huge, flat incisors. It lived and, in accordance with unearths of bones of younger beavers, raised its litters at the finish of this directly chamber. The tall, tightly coiled spiral front forming the most sensible portion of the burrow is now considered an inventive way for serving to to retain moisture and regulate temperature in the animal’s burrow.




Martin and Bennett found that the incisor teeth of the extinct beaver <em>Palaeocastor</em> were a perfect match for the grooves on the infillings of the Devil’s Corkscrews.

Martin and Bennett discovered that the incisor enamel of the extinct beaver Palaeocastor had been an excellent fit for the grooves on the infillings of the Devil’s Corkscrews.

(Olaf Peterson’s 1906 learn about)

Scattered clusters of the burrows of Palaeocastor are steadily present in nice numbers. These clusters almost definitely resembled the “towns” of present-day prairie canine. Interestingly, different animals infrequently visited the burrows—together with an extinct relative of martens and weasels, almost definitely having a look to make a meal of the burrow’s maker.

But what of the plant tissues that Barbour had came upon inside of the burrows? To clear up that thriller, Martin and Bennett famous that the rocks containing the Daimonelix burrows had been laid down in a seasonally dry atmosphere. Under such stipulations, vegetation would have issue discovering sufficient moisture to live on. But inside of the Daimonelix tunnels there was once a lot more humidity and moisture-seeking vegetation temporarily grew their roots into the partitions of the burrows. In truth, the enlargement was once so plentiful, the inner of the burrow partitions would should be cropped again through the beavers once in a while with a view to deal with get entry to. Since the rocks of the Harrison Formation include so much of ash from close by volcanoes, rainwater flowing thru the soil would change into saturated with silica. Plant roots readily absorbed silica. Gradually, the root-lined partitions become mineralized and sooner or later the whole burrow was once crammed in with silicified roots.

Mystery solved. What began out with the discovering of curious fossils from the badlands of Nebraska resulted in an in depth reconstruction of an historical ecosystem and the lives of some of its population. Every fossil carries this possible—to clue researchers into discoveries about the historical atmosphere and the vegetation and organisms that after thrived in it. As for Barbour, he it seems that went to his grave denying that Daimonelix was once a rodent burrow.

The Daimonelix burrow with a skeleton of its maker, the extinct beaver referred to as Palaeocaster is on view in the new fossil corridor “Deep Time” at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

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